Nu Rho Psi

The purpose of Nu Rho Psi is to:NRP logo smaller

  • encourage professional interest and excellence in scholarship, particularly in neuroscience;
  • award recognition to students who have achieved such excellence in scholarship;
  • advance the discipline of neuroscience; encourage intellectual and social interaction between students, faculty, and professionals in neuroscience and related fields;
  • promote career development in neuroscience and related fields;
  • increase public awareness of neuroscience and its benefits for the individual and society; and
  • encourage service to the community.

What are the benefits of membership?

Nu Rho PsiThe first and foremost benefit of Nu Rho Psi membership is the honor and recognition of academic excellence. Almost all graduate schools and employers ask for a list of honors. Membership in Nu Rho Psi is a way of building these credentials. Members receive membership certificates and lapel pins as an indication of the honor. Beyond this, Nu Rho Psi membership is a springboard for the networking of like-minded colleagues interested in the study of the brain. The society offers travel awards to undergraduate members who wish to attend the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience (FUN) and Society for Neuroscience Annual Meetings. As the Society transitions to a regional structure over the next few years, there will be regional and national meetings where neuroscientists from around the country will gather to share scientific findings. News and information is available to members via the Nu Rho Psi online newsletter.

What is the cost?

Membership in Nu Rho Psi is for life and the induction fee ($40.00 for students; $50.00 for faculty) is the only payment to the National organization.

Eligibility Requirements

Candidates should have completed two Neuroscience courses, at least one of which is a core class in the NBB major and have a GPA of at least 3.5/4.0. In addition, membership is largely based on showing extracurricular interest in the fields of neuroscience and behavior and genuine interest in participating in the activities of Nu Rho Psi.

Executive Board: Fall 2018 - Spring 2019

President: Sama Radwan

Year: 2018-2019
Contact: sama.radwan@emory.edu

“Why you choose NBB?”: I was drawn toward neuroscience following a quite memorable community service project several years ago. I met a young girl with schizophrenia and was immediately amazed by the complexities of the brain­–behavior interaction. The idea that our neural systems are affected by both genes and our environment, and continue to impact our personal experience of the world, has driven me toward the investigation of such topics through my studies. The NBB faculty have supported me in pursuing fellowship opportunities and exploring my interests, which lie at the intersection of research and medicine. They share a myriad of backgrounds and provide great resources for networking and learning beyond the classroom. Through the interdisciplinary nature of the NBB program, we all work together to understand disease and apply our knowledge to promote well-being. 


Vice-President: Talin Handa

Year: 2018-2019
Contact: talin.handa@emory.edu

One of my favorite professors at Emory, Dr. Nemenman said, “Studying string theory cannot be more exciting than studying the brain that can study string theory.” Having taken courses in a variety of disciplines, such as physics, chemistry, and business, indeed nothing was more exciting than any neuroscience course I had taken. While many of my friends and classmates question why I do take courses in different subjects, I am always quick to point the connections to neuroscience. This cross-communication between different fields is a strong point of the NBB program. This nature of the major and fascination of the brain, along with innumerable research opportunities in various fields, attracted me to NBB.


Treasurer: Javier Omar

Year: 2018-2019

 

“Why you choose NBB?”: Coming into Emory I had (and continue to have) quite varied academic interests, ranging from political science to chemistry, and I did not have a clear picture of what I wanted to pursue as an academic path (I was in a similar boat as most of my fellow 18-year-old peers). As my first semester at Emory slowly came to an end, I started to realize that because of my varied academic interests I would need to focus on a field that would let me integrate these interests in a productive and effective way (I would later come to realize that what I was looking for was a highly interdisciplinary field). Fortunately for me, I was at an institution that placed a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary work. As I was considering a wide array of majors my second semester with this keen interest in finding a highly interdisciplinary field, I realized that while many departments and programs at Emory value the idea of being interdisciplinary, that there was one program, in particular, that was constructed on the basis of interdisciplinary and collaborative work. Because you are reading this it must not be a major surprise that I am referring to the Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Program (NBB). The essence of this program of study is to combine the knowledge offered by the fields of neuroscience, psychology, biology, and anthropology to better comprehend the complex nature of both the human brain and human behavior. My love for this field has evolved throughout my time at Emory and because of the wide range of courses (e.g., Cognition, Drugs and Behavior, Sleep and Dreaming, Human Disease and Behavior, etc.) I have been fortunate enough to take and my three years of research experience at the Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation (where my work focused on investigating the role of aerobic exercise interventions on cognitive health in sedentary older adults) I now have a concrete belief that I want to pursue a Ph.D. in the field of neuroscience. Thanks to the NBB program I have found a life-long passion of mine and most importantly I have the tools and knowledge necessary to pursue that passion.

 

Secretary: Sarah Coolidge

Year: 2018-2019
Contact: sarah.jean.coolidge@emory.edu

 

“Why you choose NBB?”: There are so many reasons why I ~lobe~ NBB! My favorite aspect about it is that it allows for such a wide degree of flexibility and independence within both the program itself as well as with the actual content available and covered. The ability to pursue and investigate your own interests has allowed me to take a range of different courses including those on research development, biological systems, drug systems, psychological disorders, and many more. I have also had very positive and impactful experiences with the faculty and staff and have been introduced to so many different subjects and opportunities that I would not have necessarily known or learned more about if not for the connections and resources available in the program!